Tag Archive: development



How to Let Your Hero Beat Your Villain – Villain’s Tragic Flaw.

Abigail 2.0


As I stated in on of my previous posts, I decided it is time for a change. Abigail’s change to be exact. I realized this when I started to pay attention to characters’ designs. I noticed that most little girls had big, naive eyes, almost as if they were filled with hopes and dreams. I made the decision to apply that to my own character. At first I was going to start from scratch as you can see in this picture:

Abigail's new headBut then I realized that would take me much to long. So is started adding pieces from my previous version to complete the new one. Before that of course I created several thumbnail sketches of changes I wanted to make. Among those were adding freckles, changing the eyebrow shape, new hairstyle, different color scheme and other small changes. The hardest thing to pick was a new color scheme. These are some combinations I tried:

I decided to go with the burgundy style. Overall I am happy with the new design. Here is a side by side comparison:

If you have any comments, suggestions, or anything, don’t hesitate to post! More pictures/videos to come.


Characters are essential in a story. That is why it is imperative that yous pend a good of time developing them. Each should have a distinct personality that is memorable. Keep in mind that people have preconceptions, and judge people based on stereotypes, and physical appearances, even when they do not mean to do so. You can use this as an advantage at times. We all know stock characters such as the typical damsel in despair, mad scientist, or even the nerd. You can create a character and put him/her in a ironic situation. Doing that can capture the attention of your audience. If you have a tomboyish girl who suddenly decides to participate in a beauty pageant, it creates an unexpected situation. This could cause the audience to question the girl’s motif, guess the reason, and watch to see if they are right.

By giving your character a history, and explaining how he/she got to the way they are, it gives more meaning to the story. If your character is generally loud and obnoxious, then in a moment when he/she is quiet, it creates a great contrast.

You have to know your character inside out. Ask yourself the right questions. Start with the basics. The first one you should answer is “What is my character’s goal?” The answer will drive the character’s action and in turn the story. Other things you should figure out are name, age, location, hobby, fears, and qualities.

Basically, to create believable characters, start with an archetype, build on it, reveal the character’s motives, and show how they deal with their internal and external conflicts. Grill yourself with all possibilities until you are burned out. It is only after the development of the character is over that you should start designing your character.

Further reading:

  • Character Animation Crash Course by Eric Goldberg
  • Creating Characters with Personality: For Film, TV, Animation, Video Games, and Graphic Novels by Tom Bancroft

Good Questions:

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